Build an Amazing HTML Editor Using Visual Studio Code

vscode html
Today we’re going to build an amazing HTML editor using Visual Studio Code (VS Code), a powerful, versatile cross-platform code editor that provides a lot of capabilities. Let’s get this out of the way up front: I’m a raving VS Code fan! In a previous post, I showed you how to Build an Amazing Markdown Editor, and now we’re going to learn how to create a fabulous HTML editor as well. Let’s get started! Continue reading

Build an Amazing Markdown Editor Using Visual Studio Code and Pandoc

VS Code Markdown Editor

Today we’re going to build an amazing Markdown editor using Visual Studio Code and Pandoc. This system will include real-time Markdown linting and the ability to generate html, docx, and pdf documents quickly with the potential to produce many other document formats as well.

Markdown is a simple markup language that allows one to write documents using a text editor and transform those documents into many different formats.  Among other things, it works beautifully for documenting source code since the Markdown documents can be checked in and versioned with Git or your source control system of choice. Continue reading

Using Visual Studio Code with a Raspberry Pi (Raspbian)

Learning through Making (LTM) logoWe’re back with our LTM (Learning through Making) series of Node.js tutorials and we’re gearing up and getting ready to write some code!  We’ve learned how to build a Raspberry Pi from the ground up including Node.js, we’ve created a web server in Node without code, and we’ve even managed to get this web server on the Internet as a cool trick.

So how are we going to write Node.js code? There’s nothing that would stop us from simply jumping onto our RasPi and using the Leafpad text editor or even the nano console-based editor to write our code.  I propose that we use some more robust tools in the form of an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) to help us along in our coding journey.

It turns out that the RasPi 2 and RasPi 3—in spite of the significant CPU/memory boost they offer over their predecessors—will run most IDEs a bit sluggishly and will be frustrating for any serious Node.js work.  I offer here a creative alternative we will use to expedite the software development lifecycle and run the Node.js code natively on the Pi. Continue reading

Visual Studio Code Jumpstart for Node.js Developers

VS Code iconVisual Studio Code is an amazing, lightweight code editor and works great for Node.js development. I like it so much that I am recommending it for those doing the free Learning through Making (LTM) tutorial series I am creating.  My Using Visual Studio Code with a Raspberry Pi (Raspbian) article is closely coupled to this article; however, this article is intended to help you develop with VS Code whether you are using a RasPi or not.

Now, let’s get started with first things first. This article is geared toward awesome, cutting edge people who want to develop with Node.js and leverage the latest ES6 (ES2015) features rather than being content living in yesteryear.  🙂   Am I resonating with you and describing who you are or who you want to be?  If so, let’s get started. Continue reading

Right click on Windows folder and open with Visual Studio Code

I’m all about using Visual Studio Code for Node.js development.  It is a lightweight code editor and runs on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux.  I enjoy it so much that I also use it for Node.js projects on the Raspberry Pi.  To accomplish this, I create a Windows file share on the RasPi as described in my Beginner’s Guide to Installing Node.js on the Raspberry Pi and map a drive on my Windows system to the RasPi.  I am then able to use VS Code to create my Node.js code and jump onto the RasPi to run the actual code.

Anyway, back to our regularly scheduled program…  Today’s topic is aimed at Windows users who are using Visual Studio Code and want to be able to right click on a given folder and launch VS Code.  We’re going to add a right click context menu item to “Open Folder as VS Code Project” since it saves time—and it’s more fun! Continue reading